dangerousperson:

instantramenkitten:

Cat Hat
$16.99

CAHAT
CAAAAAAHT CA H  TTTt

dangerousperson:

instantramenkitten:

Cat Hat

$16.99

CAHAT

CAAAAAAHT CA H  TTTt

"Top of the Stairs", a colored pencil work by artist Jeffrey M Green. Website: http://jeffreymgreenartist.yolasite.com/. Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/jeffreymgreen.artist.

Party Cats! By Dianna Xu

Party Cats! By Dianna Xu

oliviatheelf:

psychic-embrace:

thats similar to cats look like on acid. at least to me lmao. like i could see my cat’s aura

☮My Hippie Blog!ʚϊɞ

oliviatheelf:

psychic-embrace:

thats similar to cats look like on acid. at least to me lmao. like i could see my cat’s aura

My Hippie Blog!ʚϊɞ

allthingsfinnish:

Kissa PoikasineenAdolf von Beckeroil  1863Ateneum

allthingsfinnish:

Kissa Poikasineen
Adolf von Becker
oil  1863
Ateneum

ivanchanstudio:

Here Kitty, oil on canvas, 24” x 36” COLLECTED on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Buddha means “awakened one.” It was applied to Siddhartha Gautama after he achieved enlightenment in the 6th century BCE.
In Buddhist doctrine, the capacity lies in every sentient being to become awakened: Buddha nature exists in all creatures great and small. 
Your cat may be a Buddha in disguise.
The opulent colors and iridescent halo of this 24” x 36” painting are based off of classic East Asian paintings of bodhisattvas (Buddhist saints). Wherever it’s hung, it promises to bring a thoughtful smile to your lips and a breath of fresh air for your spirit.

ivanchanstudio:

Here Kitty, oil on canvas, 24” x 36” COLLECTED on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Buddha means “awakened one.” It was applied to Siddhartha Gautama after he achieved enlightenment in the 6th century BCE.

In Buddhist doctrine, the capacity lies in every sentient being to become awakened: Buddha nature exists in all creatures great and small.

Your cat may be a Buddha in disguise.

The opulent colors and iridescent halo of this 24” x 36” painting are based off of classic East Asian paintings of bodhisattvas (Buddhist saints). Wherever it’s hung, it promises to bring a thoughtful smile to your lips and a breath of fresh air for your spirit.

bpod-mrc:

16 November 2013
Kaleidoscopic Cats
Famous for his humorous portrayal of cats, English Edwardian artist Louis Wain battled with mental illness throughout his life. Pictured here are six cats he painted, which psychiatrist Walter Maclay arranged into a series (top left to bottom right) that in his view illustrated Wain’s deterioration. Whether Wain (1860-1939) suffered from the disorder we now call schizophrenia (a term first used in 1908) is still a matter for debate. However, a biological explanation linking creativity and mental illness is beginning to emerge. One example includes a variant of the neuregulin 1 gene. In humans this is linked to psychosis, but it also correlates with creativity in people of high intellectual and academic ability. This observation, while helping to dispel some of the myths surrounding mental illness, may go some way to explaining why psychotic disorders prevail across generations.
Written by Brona McVittie
—
Original images by Louis WainThis work is in the public domain in the European UnionResearch published in Nature Reviews Neuroscience, June 2008

bpod-mrc:

16 November 2013

Kaleidoscopic Cats

Famous for his humorous portrayal of cats, English Edwardian artist Louis Wain battled with mental illness throughout his life. Pictured here are six cats he painted, which psychiatrist Walter Maclay arranged into a series (top left to bottom right) that in his view illustrated Wain’s deterioration. Whether Wain (1860-1939) suffered from the disorder we now call schizophrenia (a term first used in 1908) is still a matter for debate. However, a biological explanation linking creativity and mental illness is beginning to emerge. One example includes a variant of the neuregulin 1 gene. In humans this is linked to psychosis, but it also correlates with creativity in people of high intellectual and academic ability. This observation, while helping to dispel some of the myths surrounding mental illness, may go some way to explaining why psychotic disorders prevail across generations.

Written by Brona McVittie

Original images by Louis Wain
This work is in the public domain in the European Union
Research published in Nature Reviews Neuroscience, June 2008